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Minimally Invasive Surgery in the Foot & Ankle

There are numerous surgical
treatment methods to foot & ankle
illnesses, but many of them are
replaced by minimally invasive
surgery (MIS), for example, Percutaneous Distal Chevron Osteotomy to treat hallux valgus, Percutaneous Cheilectomy for hallux rigidus, distal metatarsal minimally invasive osteortomy for metatarsalgia, and endoscopic plantar fascia release to treat plantar fasciitis. There are many advantages of MIS over other methods, including minimal injury to adjacent tissue, reduction of post-operative complications & morbidity, enhancement of rehabilitation progress, cosmetically more acceptable scars. Arthroscopic and endoscopic applications have also become a standard procedure during diagnosis to give a far superior view, and treat some tendon conditions.

Is it really frozen shoulder?

Shoulder pain is commonly labelled
as 'frozen shoulder'. Frozen
shoulder affects about two percent
of the general population. It
commonly affects people between the ages of 40 and 60 years, with no clear predisposition based on sex and arm dominance. Frozen shoulder is a poorly understood condition characterised by inflammation within the shoulder joint with progressive tightening and thickening joint capsule, giving rise to pain and reduced range of motion. The cardinal sign of frozen shoulder is loss of external rotation. The natural history of frozen shoulder typically goes through three phases: 'freezing' phase, 'frozen' phase, and 'thawing' phase.

Interventional Pain Management

Pain is a multidimensional
experience. Chronic pain differs
from acute pain in that it lasts
for more than 3-6 months, and there
may not be obvious tissue injury leading to the pain. The pathway leading from stimulus to perception may be sensitised. There is often associated depression. Management of chronic pain therefore requires a holistic multi-disciplinary approach. In addition to pharmacological treatment, psychosocial support, physiotherapy and operative treatment, interventional techniques may benefit some patients by defining the pain generator and offers prolonged relief.

Colonoscopy FAQs

A colonoscopy is an examination of
the inside lining of the large
bowel. Any abnormalities will be
visualised on the monitor screen.
Small polyps are usually removed at the same time, or biopsies of large polyps, tumours or inflammation will be taken for further evaluation. It is recommended to undergo colonoscopy at age of 50, or if you have symptoms like bleeding from the back passage, persistent abdominal pain, change in bowel habits, unusual diarrhoea, etc.

Clavicle Fracture FAQs

Fractures of the collar bone
(clavicle) are common and seen in
all age groups. Most are due to a
fall onto the shoulder. Clavicle
fractures are divided into medial, mid-shaft and lateral fractures, in which mid-shaft are the most common (80%). Non-operative treatment has traditionally been the norm for treating mid-shaft, operative treatment is indicated for severely displaced, comminuted ('shattered') fractures, especially if associated with high-energy trauma. Almost all displaced lateral clavicle fractures should be operated, as they have a very high rate of non-union, and the non-unions are very difficult to treat. Medial clavicle fractures are not very common (2%).

Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery

Thoracotomy is one of the most
painful incisions of any surgical
procedure, and its associated
complications, such as pneumonia,
are well known. Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS) offers the benefits of a minimally invasive approach with reduced pain and complications. Nowadays, many illnesses can be treated via VATS, with nearly 100% success rate and lower recurrence rate. Additional to surgical use, VATS can also be used for biopsy, offering a clear examination of the pleural cavity and the lung lobes, etc.

Meniscal Regeneration By Meniscal Scaffold Implant Actifit Polyurethane Scaffold

Irreparable major meniscal tears
pose a very difficult problem in
the young and active patients who
sustain these kinds of injuries.
Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, the most commonly used treatment option for meniscus tear creates substantial number of patients suffering the effect of a lost meniscus cartilage which is knee pain and possible degenerative joint disease in long term. It is extremely important to preserve the meniscus as much as possible to avoid degenerative knee joint progression. This article will introduce the new minimally invasive surgery in Hong Kong to regenerate the meniscus with a degradable scaffold.

My thyroid nodules! What shall I do?

The prevalence of thyroid nodules
in any population will depend on
various factors which include…
sex, age, diet, iodine deficiency
and also to the likelihood of radiation exposure be it environmental or therapeutic. Thyroid nodules are more common in females and the prevalence increases with age such that 5% of the population aged 60 years will have a thyroid nodule. There is also a direct dose response relation of thyroid nodularity to radiation exposure to the head and neck region.

Diagnosis of Low Back Pain FAQs

Accurate diagnosis of back pain
isn’t always easy. The human
spine is very complex, so it can be
difficult to pinpoint the exact
cause of low back pain or other symptoms. Additionally, other factors, like depression, anxiety, or stress, can contribute to the symptoms of back pain. MRI scanning is safe and produces outstanding images of the spine, but, unfortunately, it doesn’t show ‘pain’, therefore, in more complex cases of back pain it can often be very helpful to inject X-ray dye and local anaesthetic into the back to identify, and in some cases, treat, the painful structures.

Treatment of Cervical Disc Hernia or Degeneration

Cervical disc hernia with spinal
cord or nerve root compression is a
common disease. It is common
younger population including those
without special risk factors. Surgical treatment has good outcomes if conservative treatment fails. The surgical risk is not high. There are newer technology to overcome the problem of the past in reducing the surgical risk and speeding recovery. First line treatment for most cervical disc problems is pain control and physical therapies. Second line treatment includes injections and radiofrequency neurotomy. If this approach fails, or if there is significant neurological deficit, surgical treatment is appropriate.