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Is it really frozen shoulder?

Shoulder pain is commonly labelled
as 'frozen shoulder'. Frozen
shoulder affects about two percent
of the general population. It
commonly affects people between the ages of 40 and 60 years, with no clear predisposition based on sex and arm dominance. Frozen shoulder is a poorly understood condition characterised by inflammation within the shoulder joint with progressive tightening and thickening joint capsule, giving rise to pain and reduced range of motion. The cardinal sign of frozen shoulder is loss of external rotation. The natural history of frozen shoulder typically goes through three phases: 'freezing' phase, 'frozen' phase, and 'thawing' phase.

Stomach Ulcers & Related Conditions FAQs

Indigestion is a common symptom for
city dwellers, and is usually
caused by either gastritis or
ulcers. Gastritis refers to
inflammation of the lining of the stomach and could lead to ulcers if left untreated. There are many causes for gastritis or ulcers: a bacterium called Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori); certain aspirin or aspirin containing drugs; smoking; alcohol; excessive stomach acid; irregular eating habits; stress, etc. The best way to diagnose these conditions is by gastroscopy, which uses a thin flexible tube with a micro-camera attached to its tip, which displays images on a monitor in real time.  

ACL FAQs

ACL is a tough band of collagen
inside your knee joining your thigh
bone to your shin bone and is vital
to controls the complex gliding and
bending movement of the knee which allow people to do everything from walking slowly to ballet and gymnastics. ACL can be torn if you twist your knee too far or change direction too quickly. Unfortunately, a substantial proportion of acute ACL ruptures is missed. Double-Bundle ACL Reconstruction is employed which has superior rotational stability.

Investigation of a New Breast Symptom: A Guide for Family Physicians

The National Breast Cancer Centre
(NBCC) of Australia has developed
this guide to maximise the
effectiveness of investigation of
women who present to their family physician with a new breast symptom. The triple test approach is the recommended approach to maximise diagnostic accuracy in the investigation of breast changes, which includes the following components: medical history and clinical breast examination, imaging – mammography and/or ultrasound, non-excision biopsy – fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytology and/or core biopsy. Ultrasound and/or mammography should be conducted regularly from the age of 25.

OGD FAQs

OGD is the examination of the
oesophagus, stomach and duodenum
by a gastroscope, which has its own
camera lens and light source. It
is most often used to evaluate symptoms of indigestion such as upper abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting or swallowing difficulty. It can also be used to look for the cause of bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract. OGD also allows your doctor to obtain biopsies from the lining of the upper gastrointestinal tract for laboratory testing. OGD can even be used to remove polyps (usually benign growths) or treat bleeding.

Achilles Tendinopathy FAQs

Achilles tendinopathy refers to
diseases of the Achilles tendon,
which often caused by degenerative
problems with combination of
intrinsic and extrinsic factors. This article will focus on non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy. Non-operative treatments are often preferred over conservative treatment which echoes the histological evidence of a degenerative disease process that has poor capacity for healing.

Lumbar Disc Replacement FAQs

The ‘intervertebral discs’ are
the shock absorbers between the
bones of the spine. Unfortunately,
they often degenerate – tearing,
bursting, or just wearing out. They can cause back or neck pain. The low back is known as the ‘lumbar’ region. The usual treatment is rest and painkillers, followed by core muscle (Pilates) exercises. If pain is a problem despite this treatment, one option is to have an operation. Fusion operation is the conventional approach. In a fusion, some or all of the disc is removed and replaced with bone, which joins to the bones above and below the disc together. It is the gold standard for comparing all other operations, including the new operation of lumbar disc replacement.

Stroke Prevention and Management

Stroke is a leading cause of death
worldwide and the commonest cause
of permanent disability in adults.
The death and disability from
stroke is expected to increase in Hong Kong as the population rapidly ages in coming decades. This article highlights the need to reduce the local burden of stroke through the screening of individuals for stroke risk management and through ensuring a prompt and effective treatment response after stroke onset.

Meniscal Regeneration By Meniscal Scaffold Implant Actifit Polyurethane Scaffold

Irreparable major meniscal tears
pose a very difficult problem in
the young and active patients who
sustain these kinds of injuries.
Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, the most commonly used treatment option for meniscus tear creates substantial number of patients suffering the effect of a lost meniscus cartilage which is knee pain and possible degenerative joint disease in long term. It is extremely important to preserve the meniscus as much as possible to avoid degenerative knee joint progression. This article will introduce the new minimally invasive surgery in Hong Kong to regenerate the meniscus with a degradable scaffold.

Breast Screening: Today

The average woman depending on her
racial ethnicity has a one in 6~9
chance of developing breast cancer
during her lifetime, based on a
life expectancy of 85 years. Nowadays, screening guidelines for breast cancer for an individual woman should take in account those with an average risk versus those with an increased risk because of familial or genetic predisposition. This is best achieved by using ‘triple assessment’, comprising imaging (usually mammography and ultrasound), clinical examination and image guided needle biopsy for histological examination where indicated.