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8/F China Building
29 Queen's Road Central
 
1210 Ocean Centre
5 Canton Road, Tsimshatsui
 
International SOS Clinic
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United Family Hospital
 
United Family Clinic
Eur Am International Medical Center
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Kiang Wu Hospital
 
 
 
 

Hallux Rigidus FAQs

Hallux Rigidus is describing the
degeneration of the joint at the
base of the big toe – called
metatarsophalangeal, or MTP joint.
It is the most common site of arthritis in the foot region. It is usually develops in adults at the ages between 30 and 60 years. No exact cause is agreed so far. There are numerous non-surgical treatments and surgical treatments, which is chosen based on the severity.

Investigation of a New Breast Symptom: A Guide for Family Physicians

The National Breast Cancer Centre
(NBCC) of Australia has developed
this guide to maximise the
effectiveness of investigation of
women who present to their family physician with a new breast symptom. The triple test approach is the recommended approach to maximise diagnostic accuracy in the investigation of breast changes, which includes the following components: medical history and clinical breast examination, imaging – mammography and/or ultrasound, non-excision biopsy – fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytology and/or core biopsy. Ultrasound and/or mammography should be conducted regularly from the age of 25.

Sacroiliac Joint Pain FAQs

Sacroiliac (SI) joint pain is a
challenging condition affecting 15%
to 25% of patients with axial low
back pain, for which there is no
standard long-term treatment. Recent studies have demonstrated that historical and physical examination findings and radiological imaging are insufficient to diagnose SI joint pain. The most commonly used method to diagnose the SI joint as a pain generator is with small volume local anaesthetic blocks. In the article, I will try to explain the diagnostic methods and available treatments in detail.

Hamstring Tendon Tears FAQs

This provides information to
patients on 'high' hamstring tendon
‘tears’ or ‘bone
avulsions’, but not
‘tendinitis’ or ‘tendinopathy’. A ‘tear’ in this context usually means the tendon tears away from the bone. Sometimes the tendon pulls a piece of bone away, instead of tearing away from the bone, and this is called a ‘bone avulsion’. The ‘Hamstring Tendinopathy FAQs’ describe ‘tendinitis’, which is usually treated differently.

My Thyroid has Nodules! What shall I do?

The prevalence of thyroid nodules
in any population will depend on
various factors which include…
sex, age, diet, iodine deficiency
and also to the likelihood of radiation exposure be it environmental or therapeutic. Thyroid nodules are more common in females and the prevalence increases with age such that 5% of the population aged 60 years will have a thyroid nodule. There is also a direct dose response relation of thyroid nodularity to radiation exposure to the head and neck region.

Clavicle Fracture FAQs

Fractures of the collar bone
(clavicle) are common and seen in
all age groups. Most are due to a
fall onto the shoulder. Clavicle
fractures are divided into medial, mid-shaft and lateral fractures, in which mid-shaft are the most common (80%). Non-operative treatment has traditionally been the norm for treating mid-shaft, operative treatment is indicated for severely displaced, comminuted ('shattered') fractures, especially if associated with high-energy trauma. Almost all displaced lateral clavicle fractures should be operated, as they have a very high rate of non-union, and the non-unions are very difficult to treat. Medial clavicle fractures are not very common (2%).

Gastrointestinal (GI) Surgery Specialist Service

Gastrointestinal (GI) surgery is
one of the major subspecialties of
surgery. It includes every part of
the gut from the oesophagus (food
pipe) that carries food from the mouth to the other end from which digested residue leaves the body. Common surgical procedures associated with GI Diseases include endoscopy, Cholecystectomy, Hernia operation, Haemorrhoid operation, Anti-reflux surgery, Major surgery for cancer, and Obesity surgery.

Is it really frozen shoulder?

Shoulder pain is commonly labelled
as 'frozen shoulder'. Frozen
shoulder affects about two percent
of the general population. It
commonly affects people between the ages of 40 and 60 years, with no clear predisposition based on sex and arm dominance. Frozen shoulder is a poorly understood condition characterised by inflammation within the shoulder joint with progressive tightening and thickening joint capsule, giving rise to pain and reduced range of motion. The cardinal sign of frozen shoulder is loss of external rotation. The natural history of frozen shoulder typically goes through three phases: 'freezing' phase, 'frozen' phase, and 'thawing' phase.

Colonoscopy FAQs

A colonoscopy is an examination of
the inside lining of the large
bowel. Any abnormalities will be
visualised on the monitor screen.
Small polyps are usually removed at the same time, or biopsies of large polyps, tumours or inflammation will be taken for further evaluation. It is recommended to undergo colonoscopy at age of 50, or if you have symptoms like bleeding from the back passage, persistent abdominal pain, change in bowel habits, unusual diarrhoea, etc.

Articular Cartilage Injuries in the Knee FAQs

Articular cartilage is the white
shiny covering over the ends of the
bones in a joint – it is the
substance which makes a joint a
joint, rather than two pieces of bone rubbing together. Articular cartilage injuries in the knee usually come from a twist or a fall. Articular cartilage defects can often be difficult to diagnose. Most commonly they cause vague pain. Other symptoms include swelling, and mechanical symptoms, such as popping, catching, giving way and even locking.